Daily Diary: ‘Stay at Home’ Day 3

Here we are, day three of our national ‘Stay at Home’ strategy, and I feel unsettled, out of sorts…

It’s not the being at home bit that bothers me, that I’m always happy with. It’s the not knowing, the waiting for whatever happens next in our global Covid-19 crisis, with no real end-game in sight. The thing is, it does seem inevitable that we all need to catch it at some point in order to gain our herd immunity, so it feels like ‘when’ not ‘if’. I understand the importance of slowing it down, stopping a peak of infection that our health services simply cannot cope with, but the sheer nothingness of waiting… just interminable waiting… is what I’m struggling most with right now.

I can’t help but worry about my family – in particular my two elderly parents both with serious underlying health conditions, who I already haven’t seen since the end of January as I’ve had a succession of annoying colds and things I was trying not to pass on to them for exactly that reason. But what if something awful happens to them and I haven’t even seen them recently? And then there’s my husband’s family currently in self-isolation at home in Louisiana, apparently one of the US Covid-19 hot-spots – right now that feels like a really long way away.

There’s also my own ongoing health to consider – I’m technically bordering on the ‘at risk’ category having asthma, and with everything I catch always going straight to my chest we’re being careful with unnecessary contact. Thankfully I’ve been furloughed from work, although my husband now works in a local supermarket so will be continuing to cover his shifts for the duration. The plan is to come straight in, have a shower and change his clothes before even giving me a hug, so caution is definitely the name of the game for us right now.

But in the meantime I’m trying to count my blessings and stay focused on the positives. We have a lovely home to live in, with our own garden front and back, and we live in a beautiful part of the world that is not overly populated. We always have a well-stocked store cupboard and freezer (an old habit from me living for years in the middle of nowhere with not much transport) and I love cooking, so we’re not suffering through no longer being able to eat out anywhere for now.

And although we now live close to most of my family (who of course we can’t see at the moment), because we lived in London for so long we’re all used to keeping in touch virtually so already have all those technologies in place so feel ahead of the curve in that regard, which certainly helps. So we’re all dealing with it all as best we can, looking out for each other remotely, virtually, keeping in touch and giving moral support as much as anything. As a family we’re currently sharing a strong feeling of all being in this together, and that is strangely comforting in this scary time of global crisis…

Weekly Prompts: Daily Diary

A Bit of Beethoven

Yesterday Ritu at But I Smile Anyway posted a re-worked song which she not only provided new lyrics for but actually recorded and sang herself – so I thought I might have a go at writing new lyrics for something, too. I had initally thought of ‘My Sharona’ by the Knack but a quick search online shows me someone has beaten me to it, so sadly no-go with that one.

But I know lots of people have been playing Beethoven’s ‘Ode to Joy’ together-while-apart so I thought with a little bit of artistic licence I might be able to write some new lyrics to that, suitable for our current situation. To be honest no amount of pep-talk could convince me to record it myself, but its a well-known tune most people will know…

So here we are… my take on a bit of 19th Century Beethoven adapted for our 21st Century Covid-19 crisis… It helps if you sing it out loud and with passion, rather than just read it… enjoy! πŸ™‚

Covid-19, world pandemic

Virus of corona strain

Mass infection, death toll rising

When will life feel safe again?

Watch as arrogant denialsΒ­Β­Β­

Let real symptoms spread unchecked

Keep it hidden, not forever

Truth will out to bad effect

Watch for new dry cough and fever

Wash our hands religiously

Shop with prudence and compassion

Act as one community

β€˜Stay at home’ our national chorus

Social distancing in place

Life in lockdown, isolation

Humbling of the human race

Learn the lesson nature brings us

Treat our planet with respect

Halt our years of selfish damage

Generations of neglect

Let the world heal unpolluted

Let us all draw precious breath

Let the joy of inspiration

Save us from the brink of death

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: Amount

Home-Grown Hyacinths

There’s a lot of crappy stuff going on in the world right now and it’s a very stressful time for all of us, so I’m finding it’s necessary to focus on the little things in life to find my little moments of happiness…

Late last year I was given a pot and some dried compost cubes and three dormant hyacinth bulbs to try a grow-your-own kit thing, so starting early January I carefully followed the instructions and reconstituted the compost, planted the bulbs, gave them a good water and stuck the pot in the cold and dark under a bench in the garden shed for 10 weeks, checking it stayed damp but other than that, leaving it alone.

And to my surprise and delight, after the 10 weeks I found I had one little tiny nub of potential growth showing through the soil, so as instructed I placed the pot on the conservatory windowsill to get some sunshine. Another 10 days have passed since then, and look what I have now! Hopefully the plants will continue to grow and flower in the next few weeks – they should be a beautiful delft blue, so we’ll see what happens – fingers crossed!

So I’m really pleased to be learning to be a proper plant mummy at last, big smiles all round πŸ™‚

Weekly Smile

Suspense

There’s a surreal feeling of suspense hanging over us all right now, ominous and omnipresent, an uncomfortable undercurrent of uncertainty rippling outward as we all face an effective lockdown from now until whenever it may be. There are too many questions and not enough answers. These are undoubtedly scary times, unprecedented times, and none of us can know how things will turn out once it’s all over…

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: Suspense

Wandering and Pondering

Whenever I have difficult things in life to contemplate, I always like to go for a walk, preferably in nature. Wandering and pondering is how I like to think of it, my little calming ritual I carry with me everywhere.

The rhythmic beat of walking soothes me, the solidity of the earth beneath my feet grounds me, the fresh air revives me and the seasonal continuity of trees and flowers and water and sky and the way everything blends together to create the vastness of our beautiful landscape helps keep me sane in an increasingly mad world.

And I like to take my camera with me when I walk, so usually when I see something particularly beautiful-to-me that captures my attention I like to stop and photograph it. Maybe a different perspective, or the movement of water, or the way the light catches something is all it takes…

And so I usually return from my walk refreshed in body and mind, ready to face whatever difficulties lie ahead, until the next time… πŸ™‚

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: Contemplate