Caley Marina

Views from the Caley Marina on the banks of the Caledonian Canal in Inverness on a chilly Sunday morning in December:-)

Sunday Stroll – Muirtown Locks to Tomnahurich

Today’s walk by the Caledonian Canal in Inverness took me the comfortably walkable distance from Muirtown Locks to Tomnahurich Swing Bridge down one side of the water, then back up along the other. I started at the top of Muirtown Locks where the houses are close to the canal and walked down along the bank, heading inland (although in most of these pics I’ve turned around to keep the low winter sun behind me).

Just past Tomnahurich Cemetery, which is set on and around a natural hill formed millenia ago by glaciers, I crossed the canal by the swing bridge, and started walking up along the other bank, heading back towards the sea.

I followed the edge of the canal all the way back up to just before the Caley Marina, where the path detours a little around private property…

Then just past the Marina I turned and took an atmospheric shot facing back into the sun before reaching the top lock gate at Muirtown Locks (the point I started from), where I crossed the canal once more before my short walk home – a perfect Sundy stroll on a chilly December morning! 🙂

A Beautiful Sight

Walking along the path by the Caledonian Canal yesterday afternoon I came across this beautiful sight – it was partly the way the light hit the boats that caught my eye, the bright highlights of the white masts and the softness of the pastel clouds reflected in the stillness of the water. There’s a slight curve in the canal at this point, so I came round the corner and there they were, all these beautiful boats sitting moored in the Muirtown Basin just waiting to be captured by my camera… it felt like one of those immediate photographic moments that was just meant to be… 🙂

Stream of Consciousness Saturday: ‘ght’

My New Neighbourhood

We’ve recently moved from London to Inverness, and have bought a house close to the Northernmost end of the Caledonian Canal… this is the view from Muirtown Locks, the part of the canal we see right at the end of our road 🙂

This afternoon I took a walk further along the path leading towards the mouth of the canal, where it meets the sea of the Beauly Firth…

At the mouth of the canal there is a huge stone welcoming everyone to the Caledonian Canal…

And some interesting sea-worthy structures to photograph…

I can see I’m going to enjoy living in our new home in Inverness! 🙂

Photo A Week Challenge: In the Neighbourhood

Muirtown Swing Bridge

After any boats travelling along the Caledonian Canal have descended through the system of locks to reach the ‘natural’ water level on their way out to the Beauly Firth at Inverness, they then have to go through the Muirtown Swing Bridge.

Whenever necessary, the traffic is stopped, and the bridge swings smoothly open on a pivot to allow the boats to go through. Once the boats are safely through, the bridge swings closed again and the traffic too continues on its way 🙂

Muirtown Locks on the Caledonian Canal

Muirtown Locks in Inverness are on the Beauly Firth end of the Caledonian Canal, and comprise four closed chambers bordered by five lock gates. By increasing or decreasing the level of water within each chamber and opening and closing the gates in order, it is possible for boats travelling along the canal to be raised or lowered to the height of the next chamber, then the procedure is repeated – a bit like a water staircase for boats.

We were walking along the canal side the other day as two boats were descending through the system of locks, so I took a few pics with my camera phone. By the time we arrived, the boats had already gone through the first chamber and had started their descent towards the Beauly Firth.

The first image is taken from the middle of the first lock gate, which when closed creates a narrow pedestrian ridge across the canal, looking towards the Beauly Firth. The second is taken from the next lock gate along, looking down on the boats as the water level reduces to the level of the third chamber, shown in the third image. The fourth image shows both boats in the third chamber, and the fifth shows them in the fourth chamber with the lock gates closing behind them. The last image is of the boats waiting to descend through the last chamber to the lowest water level below 🙂

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: Middle