Canal Overflow

There was certainly water, water everywhere at the farthest Beauly Firth end of the Caledonian Canal yesterday – this tide was out, and the last sea-lock was so full the water was noisily overflowing the top of the lock-gate like a proper waterfall 🙂

Water, Water Everywhere

Photo a Week

Grey, Dull, and Still

It’s been a really grey, dull, still day today – warm enough temperature-wise, but not sunny at all so no shadows or highlights to be seen anywhere. But I enjoyed my walk along the canal this afternoon anyway, and wondered if I could maybe try to take a few deliberately grey, dull, still images to see how that worked out?

Quite happy with these, actually! 🙂

Same Walk, Different Pics

The trouble with going on the same walks all the time during lockdown is that I usually find myself taking photographs of multiple variations on a theme of the same scenes, so today I tried to take a few slightly different views of my favourite lockdown route 🙂

April A-Z: W is for Waterways

The northernmost section of the Caledonian Canal finally meets the open waters of the Beauly Firth at the Clachnaharry Sea Lock in Inverness. It always makes for such a beautiful walk up one side of the canal, across the last lock gate, and back down the other side, but particularly right now with our continued stay-at-home strategy due to Covid-19 this is a favoured form of outside exercise for many locals 🙂

For this year’s A-Z I’m going to take you on a photographic tour of My Inverness, Past and Present. I grew up in the local area, I went to school here and brought up my three children here, but I moved away to London for 18 years before returning home for good at the end of last summer.

P.S. My initial plan for my A-Z posts has necessarily been curtailed somewhat due to the current coronavirus pandemic, but we’ll get through the alphabet one way or another, however creative my use of subjects may have to be – so thank you for visiting Inverness with me, and I hope you enjoy our trip!

April A-Z: S is for Swing Bridge

There are three white-painted metal swing bridges that cross over the Caledonian Canal here in Inverness.

A road bridge at Tomnahurich, carrying the main road from Inverness along the banks of Loch Ness South West towards Fort Augustus; a road bridge at Muirtown carrying the ‘old’ road North-West out towards Beauly (it too used to be the main road before the Kessock Bridge was opened; and finally a small single track railway bridge carrying all trains in both directions that travel North of Inverness.

The two road bridges are pretty much identical, so I’ve shown the road surface view of the bridge at Tomnahurich, and the side view of its sister bridge at Muirtown. The smaller bridge with the red circle is the rail bridge at Clachnaharry.

These swing bridges literally swing open on a pivot, and a small wheel slides the entire central structure at right angles to allow boats through, before swinging closed again.

PS I’ve actually posted photographs before of the swing bridge at Muirtown in action, if anyone is interested 🙂

For this year’s A-Z I’m going to take you on a photographic tour of My Inverness, Past and Present. I grew up in the local area, I went to school here and brought up my three children here, but I moved away to London for 18 years before returning home for good at the end of last summer.

P.S. My initial plan for my A-Z posts has necessarily been curtailed somewhat due to the current coronavirus pandemic, but we’ll get through the alphabet one way or another, however creative my use of subjects may have to be – so thank you for visiting Inverness with me, and I hope you enjoy our trip!

April A-Z: M is for Muirtown Locks

When canal users need to transport their boats from a higher water level to a lower water level they traditionally use a system of locks, which are basically a series of stepped deep chambers with lock gates at either end of each chamber.

So for example here, a boat would enter the top lock, the lock gates would be closed and the water pumped out so that the water level is lowered to match that of the next chamber. Once the water levels are equal, the lock gates between the two chambers are opened and the boat moves on through to the next chamber. The operation is repeated as many times as is necessary until the boat has reached the lower level. In order for boats to move up from the lower to the higher level, the same procedure is completed in reverse, but with each chamber being filled with water rather than emptied, raising the boat further up each time.

The Muirtown Locks in Inverness, originally built in the early 1800s, comprise a flight of four locks (and therefore five lock gates) at the northern end of the Caledonian Canal. Each lock chamber is 180ft long and 40ft wide, and altogether these four locks raise the canal 32 ft from the Muirtown Basin to the Dochfour Reach. The locks, orignally cranked manually, were mechanised in 1963 – the same year I was born!

PS If you’re interested to see more I’ve previously posted images of two boats actually going through the locks at the end of last summer 🙂

For this year’s A-Z I’m going to take you on a photographic tour of My Inverness, Past and Present. I grew up in the local area, I went to school here and brought up my three children here, but I moved away to London for 18 years before returning home for good at the end of last summer.

P.S. My initial plan for my A-Z posts has necessarily been curtailed somewhat due to the current coronavirus pandemic, but we’ll get through the alphabet one way or another, however creative my use of subjects may have to be – so thank you for visiting Inverness with me, and I hope you enjoy our trip!