Home

Home…

A nineteen thirties bungalow in style

Mock-Tudor boards on double-fronted bays

Old paint-peeled rendered walls that made me smile

And fall in love in oh-so-many ways

Its shabby chic and part-neglected air

Called out to me to make this house my own

Look far beyond its age without a care

Ignore its dated dΓ©cor overtone

And now we live together in this space

Eclectic symbiosis oft appears Β 

Where partial changes slowly taking place

Bring modern touches to the faded years

I love the way the blend of old and new

Creates a loving home for me and you… ❀

Weekly Prompts: Old and New

Home Sweet Home

Who won the week for me this week is our lovely house – it’s a year almost to the day since we moved in, and I honestly think I love it more every day, knowing we intend to live here for the rest of our lives.

We finally had our new windows and doors fitted last week (several months behind our initial planned schedule, for obvious reasons – thank you, coronavirus lockdown) and the difference in how the whole internal space feels now is amazing, creating a much warmer and far more welcoming environment for us to live in than their ageing weathered predecessors were ever able to provide.

We’ve still got such a long way to go both inside and out to get the house completely the way we want it, but I know we’ll get there eventually one upgrade, one improvement at a time. And in the meantime this remains the practical, comfortable home we chose together, our secure safe space to be truly ourselves, living our own lives in our own unique way, growing older and hopefully wiser over the years.

Home to me is not supposed to be a sparkly surface-styled showhome, a classy double-spread feature in a glossy celebrity magazine. Instead it’s a private space, a sentimental personal place where we can feel we belong completely along with our private personal belongings, our brightest visions and darkest vulnerabilities, our highest hopes and deepest fears.

Home sweet home for us forever – happy first anniversary house! πŸ™‚

Wanderlust? Not me…

I honestly don’t seem to have a wanderlust bone in my body: I have no real desire to travel far from home. I truly like being at home. Over the course of my fifty-six years on this planet I’ve only visited a handful of countries – France, Belgium, Canada, USA – and am someone who takes the term ‘staycation’ literally, even preferring to stay at home for any holidays from work rather than visiting somewhere else within the UK πŸ™‚

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: Wanderlust

Window Shopping, Plain and Simple

When we bought our house ten months ago, we knew we would have to replace the ancient double glazing in both the windows and doors to be more energy efficient. As we moved in during the autumn, we’d initially decided to wait until spring and warmer weather before undergoing the upheaval. But of course in March the coronavirus hit and lockdown happened, so here we are already in mid-August only getting the new windows and doors made now.

Window shopping was a surprisingly painless experience – it actually took us very little time to decide what we wanted. The clean, sleek lines of white pvc casement windows, plain and simple, for optimal natural light and minimal long-term maintenance. We need to have two obscured glass windows, so have chosen a very plain satinised finish for these. Our new back door will be half glazed white pvc with solid bottom panelling and with the same plain satin glazing above.

Choosing our new front door took the most thought to get right, but even then we chose the door design (half glazed, solid bottom panelling) and colour (anthracite grey) without needing too much discussion, and our only consideration was the glazing. We wanted some kind of minimal design within the glass panel, but nothing too fancy either. In the end we settled for a particularly understated style of glass panel originally designed for another type of door, to be adapted for our style of door.

So right now our new doors and windows are being custom made, and should be with us sometime in September. I’m really looking forward to having them installed – the current aluminium-and-wood-framed doors and windows may still be wind and watertight (just!) but are seriously energy-inefficient and really don’t suit the property. And once we have our new windows in place, we can get on with decorating our house inside and out… what fun!

It’s inevitably going to take us years to finish everything we want to do in the house, but we’re happy enough just to take our time and do it up bit by bit as we go along. It’s one of those old properties where nothing needs done immediately but everything needs doing eventually. Things are in place but are decidedly outdated, and luckily outdated can always be updated. Hopefully the new windows and doors are going to be a really big change, and I can’t wait to see it once its all done! πŸ™‚

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: Finish

A Toss Up

I found out the other day that I’ll be going back to work very soon, and I feel very much in two minds about it all. On one hand I’m delighted to be beginning the process of creating a new normal to get back to, but on the other hand… the reality of risk is rearing its ugly head along with the fear of the unknown.

Intellectually, I know that the country – the world – cannot go on forever effectively hiding from Covid 19, holed up in hope of a miracle vaccine that can make us feel safe again. At some point in time we all have to face our fears, adapting and making the necessary changes to society that allow us all to live with Covid 19 in the community rather than potentially die from it.

But emotionally I feel decidedly anxious and wary, because however much I’ve found it frustrating at times I’ve got used to feeling snug and safe in my own home and it seems crazily counter-intuitive after months of a very successful ‘Stay at Home, Stay Safe’ campaign to now be told it’s OK, it’s safe out there too even though the virus hasn’t gone yet – basically it has to be OK because the economy is collapsing.

It’s all about finding a precarious balance, isn’t it? We balance the risk of going out into the scary world where a deadly invisible virus awaits by wearing some kind of protection from infection, and because full Hazmat suits are not practical daywear for most of us in our daily lives, we compromise and stick to wearing a simple face mask and using hand sanitiser and keeping our distance from others to keep us safe.

We have to balance the risk of catching a virus that might kill us against the risk of having no future income to live on, which in a very different way also might kill us in the end. So somewhere along the line we have to meet in the middle. It has to be done, and I know it’s almost time for me to get back out there and get on with it. And in a weird way I’m quite looking forward to it, except for when I’m not.

The department store I work in seems to have created a well-managed environment for both staff and customers to move around in, with plenty of safety measures in place to protect everyone as much as possible. So I can’t help but wonder how I’ll be feeling on my first day back, smiley and safe or frowny and fearful? Right now it feels like it could be either, and it’s going to be a toss up as to which actually wins out on the the day… πŸ™‚

Stream of Consciousness Saturday: Toss

Not Around the World in Eighty Days

Today is our 80th day of lockdown here in Scotland. For the last two weeks we’ve thankfully had a slight easing of restrictions in that we’re allowed to meet another household out of doors only while maintaining social distancing, but as far as any semblance of ‘back to normal’ goes we’re still a long way off.

And to be honest, as much as I rail against being told I must still stay at home, I can’t imagine choosing to travel anywhere much right now. I muse to myself that eighty days is double quarantine, forty days times two, and I hear myself singing quietly in my head ‘Eighty days around the world, de-da-de-da-de-daaah…’

The original story of Phileas Fogg attempting to travel ‘Around the World in Eighty Days’ was written by Jules Verne in the early 1870s, but I’ve got the theme tune in my head from a cartoon series my kids loved to watch back in the 1980s loosely based on the same story. In the cartoon the main characters are all animals, led by lion Willy Fog.

Anyway, the point is, I realised that I’ve not been further than about a mile’s radius from home in any direction for at least the past 80 days. I go out for walks locally, I walk alternately to three different supermarkets all close to home when necessary, and only once in that time I’ve ventured as far as across the bridge into town, to visit the chemist.

Like for so many others, my world for now has become my house and my garden. We don’t have a car, and the thought of getting onto a bus, a train, or a plane unnecessarily most definitely feels like a risk too far. I imagine that even after lockdown is lifted and I can go back to work (also locally) that one mile radius is going to remain for a while.

I’ve learned to feel safe in my own home, protected from outside harm, and the thought of travelling around the world just for fun no longer sounds such fun after all. It sounds reckless, almost – selfishly indulgent in the cautious mood of this current pandemic. After all our modern-day ease of travel is how the virus has spread so far around the world.

I wonder how much life will change after this – will we all go back to winging around the world on a whim without a backward glance, or will some of our current caution remain? Will this become a watershed moment in history, leading to an international paradigm shift in everyone’s psyche? Who knows, I guess we’ll just have to wait and see… πŸ™‚

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: Risk

Making a House a Home

Getting away from all the negativity and craziness in the world just now, Fandango’s Provocative Question this week asks:-

What is the one thing in life you are most excited about right now? Why?

For me, I’m excited about the ongoing process of making our house into our forever home. We moved in last October, mid-way through the month, and decided to take our time taking stock of everything before making too many major changes too quickly. It all felt so strange to begin with, it was not only a move of 600 miles to a new house for us but also to a different city, a different country, and neither of us had jobs to go to. We’d both grown up in the local area, a long time ago, but hadn’t actually lived here for decades.

There is quite a bit to do long-term in the house – we need to replace all the windows, the kitchen units and the boiler and renew the loft insulation, and also do a bit of re-routing of wiring in the loft while the area is temporarily cleared of storage flooring, so decided not to start decorating anywhere until we’d completed all the messy background work first. And we’ve also left the old floor coverings in situ throughout the house – so once the bigger changes are made, and the painting and wallpapering is done, we’ll replace the carpets at that point, but until then we’ll live with what was already there. Not at all to our taste, but definitely livable with in the meantime.

We could of course have just bought a brand new property in walk-in condition, but this was the house we both fell in love with, regardless of what needs doing to it. This is where we want to create our new home, whatever it takes and however long it takes us to get there. For us, moving from a Victorian one-bedroom first floor flat conversion in London, England with no outside space at all to a 1930s three-bedroom detached bunglow in Inverness, Scotland with a mature garden front and back has been a masive change in environment for us to get used to, however welcome a change it may be.

The timing of our move in mid-October meant we missed all the warmer summer weather and instead hit the start of cooling down towards winter, so planned initially for a quiet time spent simply settling in to our vastly increased living space during the coldest months, deciding to really get going in the spring once the weather picked up enough to start making some of those big changes. Except of course just as that time appeared on the horizon coronavirus and lock-down happened, and much of our advance planning came to an abrupt halt for the duration. And everything is still pretty much on hold even now.

So since moving in almost eight months ago we’ve changed all the blinds and curtains and all the lighting, and have taken off a couple of unnecessary internal doors between the kitchen and dining room. We’ve chosen and bought wallpaper for the living room, master bedroom, and dining room, and have removed the built-in under-counter fridge and freezer which had both seen better days, replacing them with a super-energy-efficient free-standing fridge-freezer. We’ve bought a sofa, a set of six dining chairs, two large oak wardrobes, an oak chest of drawers and two oak bedside units.

And the extra three months of frustrating lock-down down-time effectively kicking our heels workman-wise has actually turned out to be surprisingly beneficial as far as the long-term house and garden planning goes. The longer we live here, and the more we get a proper feel for the space we inhabit, the more the house is subtly indicating what it wants, showing us what might work best for us all. We’re seeing how the natural light coming in changes along with the seasons, getting a real sense where our original plans might need to be tweaked here and there to best attain our particular vision of what ‘home’ means to us.

Just being here at all is still exciting for me, living in all this wonderful space, dreaming and planning and enjoying what we have already achieved so far as well as feeling full of hope for the future. This is what we spent a long time aiming for in life, and here we are at last living in our own four house walls within our own four garden walls. Making our house into our forever home, our way, one amazing day at a time… πŸ™‚

Homecoming

I must admit this wasn’t exactly the homecoming experience we expected when we sold up our London flat at the end of last summer and relocated back to Inverness. To be honest I don’t think we really knew exactly what to expect once we moved, but I know coping with the Covid-19 crisis definitely wasn’t part of our plans!

It’s probably good we didn’t have any fixed ideas as such, beyond (1) finding somewhere to live and (2) finding work to be able to pay for it. Amazingly we found the house we wanted to buy very soon after we moved up from London, and have now both found jobs, so in that sense we’ve achieved what we hoped for.

We were already in a state of flux, already out of our comfort zones, and were just getting to the point of starting to feel properly settled into our new life after five months in our new home when lockdown began. So in a sense we’ve probably had less of an adjustment than many, because in a way life already felt up in the air for us.

Now everyone else’s life is up in the air too, no-one knows what will happen next, many businesses in many countries have been completely closed down for weeks, and world economies have suffered greatly. So right now we’re just focusing on being thankful at living here in Inverness instead of London, and taking it all step by step from there…

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: Homecoming