Tomnahurich Swing Bridge in Action

There are three very similar swing bridges over the Caledonian Canal here in Inverness – two road bridges and one railway bridge, all working on the same principle and constructed around the same time. Yesterday I was passing by just as the bridge at Tomnahurich opened, so stopped to capture the scene on camera .

The road crosses over from left to right of the picture (or right to left, depending on the direction of travel) and the bridge sits really low on the water so boats travelling the canal cannot pass underneath without the bridge moving out of the way. The traffic is temporarily stopped on either side and the entire bridge swings open sideways on a pivot and wheel (very much like a giant heavy door opening) until it sits at right angles to the road. The boat sails on through, the bridge closes again immediately, and the waiting traffic is free to pass over once more.

During the summer months this process takes place multiple times a day, and it never ceases to fascinate me – I really love the clever engineering involved! There is a warning siren that sounds continuously to let people know the bridge is opening and closing, but amazingly the mechanical operation of the bridge itself is silent and smooth and surprisingly speedy – it only takes a few minutes. This particular metal bridge has been in situ since 1938, a replacement for a previous wooden bridge that apparently worked on an entirely different principle.

I know this is a long and boring gallery if you’re not interested in seeing a series of static images of a bridge opening and closing again, but the fault is mine for not thinking to video it in action instead – duh! Anyway, I’m hoping my swing bridge opening and closing can count as an honorary canal door for today’s Thursday Doors – I know Dan loves bridges as well as doors, so fingers crossed I might just get away with it! 🙂

Fandango’s One Word Challenge: Fault

A Doorway But No Door

I found this overgrown stone doorway within the old Chapel Yard Cemetery in Inverness, but sadly no door to go with it, only an iron gate. Oh well! Hopefully I can still use some artistic license and count it as a door though?

Although most of the surviving (or at least readable) gravestones are from the late 18th to 19th Centuries, apparently there has been a graveyard of some sort on this site since the 12th Century. This is the grandest example but these open air walled ‘rooms’ dotted around seem to be old family enclosures or mausoleums belonging mainly to all the ‘big’ names of the town, although there are plenty of ordinary grave markers here too 🙂

Thursday Doors

Bricked-Up Beauty!

While walking along a quiet side-street in Inverness yesterday I found this open-air room sitting immediately behind a building that appeared still to be in use at the front – but this long-disused room now has no roof, only two full walls standing, a third wall partially in place and the external wall on the street removed entirely. The rotting floor joists are still in situ but with only a few wooden floorboards left in place, and on the main retaining wall there is an oddly-bricked-up fireplace and internal door to nowhere.

Weirdly enough it appears that it’s not that the building itself is falling down, more that this now-external room seems to have been deliberately cut off from whatever is on the other side of its party wall, with the roof and street wall being fully removed leaving it all open to the elements. So it sits all vulnerable and exposed with its inside now outside, left being neither one thing nor the other. And I’ve never seen a door bricked up with the bricks lying on their side instead of being laid flat – how strange!

So sadly this week’s Thursday Door is no longer even a proper door – I can’t help but wonder what story lies behind this abandoned unloved space? Maybe this would be a good door for me to use for next week’s brand new Thursday Door Writing Challenge… 🙂

Thursday Doors: Thistle Inn

I came across the back of this unusually-shaped public house while out for a wander locally, and wondered what kind of exciting front door would go with such a quirky building – disappointingly it turned out to be plain and brown and about as boring as you can get…

And of course like all pubs here in Scotland it’s still closed for at least the next couple of weeks due to current Covid restrictions so I have no idea what it looks like inside… Oh well, I suppose you can’t win them all! 🙂

Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors: Four in One

When I walked past this residential building this afternoon I thought – cool, what interesting stonework around these doors, I’ll get two doors in one shot. But on closer inspection each stone recess actually has two doors inset at an angle – even more cool, I’ve got four doors in one shot! 🙂

Thursday Doors

Seeing Red

Instead of my usual lockdown walk of along the canal with its same old, same old repertoire (however lovely) of water, sky, footpath, boats I decided today to walk towards town to see what I could find to photograph that was a bit different from my usual offering of flowers and landscapes.

The first thing that caught my eye was peeling red paint low down on a wall, so I decided to carry on in the same vein and look for the colour red on old buildings. And as a bonus, two of my favourite images are actually back access doors of business premises, so I can even manage a hot-off-the-press, on time Thursday Doors post this week – hooray! 🙂

Purple Church Doors

Yay! I’ve found one benefit of the quiet streets of lockdown – I really love these vibrant church doors, but the particular church in question is right on a busy city centre street that is usually congested with traffic during the day, so I never manage to find a moment when the street is empty enough to get a clear shot. But look! A beautiful triptych of purple doors! 🙂

Thursday Doors