Unusual Perspective

Cee’s Black & White Challenge this week asks us to take a photo with a different perspective than usual.

Last summer we had a (thankfully well-contained) wildfire on our local green space here, Wanstead Flats in East London. A while afterwards I went for a walk there and took some experimental shots (in colour) of some of the blackened and burned tree trunks lying around – several large old trees had previously been cut down and the charcoal-edged logs still sat exactly where they had been sitting before the fire. The resulting photographs seemed quite disappointing, just dull and dark and boring, so sadly I’d done nothing with them.

But for this particular challenge I had the idea of resurrecting and inverting some of these shots (changing them from positive to negative) and then greyscaling the resulting abstract images – and here they are! Definitely (for me) an unusual perspective of boring old blackened and burned logs 🙂

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Which Way After the Wildfire

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Although we live in Leytonstone in East London, we have a much appreciated area of open greeen space accessible only a few minutes walk from our home.

Wanstead Flats sit on the Southermost edge of the ancient Epping Forest, and provides for local residents a welcome sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of everyday city living. I usually walk there a lot, but sadly during the recent heatwave we had a wildfire that quickly spread through the tinder dry grasses, scrub and trees, causing a large area to be burned before the fire was brought under control.

A couple of weeks later once the heatwave had broken, the threat of further fire had passed, and the area was no longer cordoned off by the emergency serices I went for a long walk along my usual pathways and took these images with my phone camera. I love the way the hard compressed ground of the well-worn pathways have remained so visible across the charred earth, and how resilient nature proves itself to be.

Cee’s Which Way